Orit Zuckerman - Interactive Installations  
 
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Moving Portraits exhibited in DIS 2004

A portrait is a portraying of a persona. In real life, a person’s character is multi-faceted and complex, derived in part by subtleties, such as previous events as well as interaction with other people. A still portrait is an effective medium to describe a persona, but is limited in its ability to convey such richness. A “Moving Portrait”, utilizes interaction, dynamics, and memory attributes to portray a personality in a multi-faceted way, helping the viewer to understand the individual portrayed better, know more about a persona, and engage in a meaningful way. This kind of experience raises the awareness of how we interact with people, how complex we are and how small nuances makes a big difference.
A portrait, as an object, is an inseparable part of our emotional life, but is also a part of our environment. It represents an instance of our lives and a reflection of our feelings. However a static portrait is completely oblivious to the events that occur around it or to the people who view it.
By adding interaction, dynamics, and memory to a familiar portrait we create a different and more engaging relationship between the viewer and the portrait. The portrait ceases to be a passive object. It gains awareness and personalization that creates a unique viewing experience to different people in different ways.

The first portrait is of Pattie Maes.
Pattie was a "tough" subject to photograph. In order to make it easy for her I did the session at home with her family. This portrait documents the process.

Click to see a video of the interaction

The second portrait is of my daughter Gaia.
Gaia is a very shy 3 year old who is particularly wary of strangers in big numbers.
In Gaia’s portrait, if you stand in front of the portrait, she will gradually come out of hiding and become happier the more you look. Alas, if you are not alone she will hide again.
Our demo room in the lab, showing Gaia's portrait on the wall.

Click to see a video of the interaction


 
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